Center for Coaching Certification

The ACTO Stand for Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging

ACTO is committed to creating diversity, inclusion and belonging in the coaching profession through calling forth, honoring and inviting the uniqueness of all individuals and diverse life experiences.

In support of this stand, we acknowledge and are committed to eliminating the negative impact of personal and systemic bias, privilege and oppression, which may be conscious or unconscious, intentional or unintentional, overt or subtle. The ACTO Stand for Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging

As coach trainers, we are tasked with creating the future of the coaching profession. We commit to providing dialogue, learning and resources and to cultivating personal and organizational responsibility in alignment with this stand, at ACTO, for each of our students, members and member organizations.

In keeping with this stand, we are seeking to develop a common language and explore opportunities.  A book was recommended, “How to Be an Antiracist” by Ibram X. Kendi.  This book addresses many aspects of racism and bias.

The chapters and key points of the book include:
My Racist Introduction – great insight into the insidiousness of racism
1.     Definitions – racist versus anti-racist backed with stories that highlight the meaning
2.     Dueling Consciousness – exploring assimilation, segregation, and antiracism
3.     Power – explores the existence of power based on race and other factors
4.     Biology – includes the quote “that in genetic terms, all human beings, regardless of race, are more than 99.9 percent the same”
5.     Ethnicity – stories about an additional divide and focus of more racism
6.     Body – starts with the definition: “one who is humanizing, deracializing, and individualizing nonviolent and violent behavior” and gives stories about how color endangers because of racism
7.     Culture – a call to equalize cultural differences among racial groups
8.     Behavior – recognizing that individual behavior is just that
9.     Color – an additional level of racism
10.  White – starts with the definition of an anti-white racist and explains how racism is against the interests of all
11.  Black – starts by defining Powerless Defense stating, “The illusory, concealing, disempowering, and racist idea that Black people can’t be racist because Black people don’t have power” plus describes the impact of differentiation between black and nigger
12.  Class – exploring the intersection of class and race
13.  Space – the influence of race, bad and good, in different spaces
14.  Gender – explores both gender bias and the complications of race-gender bias and states to be truly antiracist is to be feminist and to be truly feminist is to be antiracist
15.  Sexuality – explores biases and the intersection with race and includes a commentary on detaching homophobic from heterosexual, sexism from men, feminism from women, racist from white, and antiracist from black
16.  Failure – states “To fight for mental and moral changes after policy is changed means fighting alongside growing benefits and the dissipation of fears, making it possible for antiracist power to success.  To fight for mental and moral change as a prerequisite for policy change is to fight again growing fears and apathy, making it almost impossible for antiracist power to succeed.” and “When we fail to gain support for a protest, we blame the fearful rather than our alienating presentations.”  then “The most effective demonstrations … help people find the antiracist power within.”
17.  Success – exploring racism as terminal and curable with the steps for the author noted on page 226 as an example for all
18.  Survival – includes a powerful awareness that the source of racist ideas is self-interest and asks, “What if we treated racism in the way we treat cancer?”  The analogy is built out fabulously.  Then the statement, “before we can treat, we must believe.”
Acknowledgments, Notes, Index

The Good:
An authentic exploration through experience of so many crucial conversations.

The Bad:
It is missing what each individual can do to be part of the cure.

Conclusion:
A great book and excellent foundation for working together to create the right change.

 

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4 Steps to Motivate Follow-through

Motivating follow-through is easy when you recognize personal style in the moment
and then adjust effectively.  With powerful questioning and specific focus your
client engages fully and is empowered to create their plan for implementing change. 4 Steps to Motivate Follow-through

Coach training teaches these steps in depth.  It starts with the awareness that people think, feel, and prioritize differently, and our own personalities influence how we think, feel, and prioritize.  It is essential to be aware of and adjust for how we and others function.

Step 1: Use a simple tool to you identify personal style in the moment:
· Determine if the person is Emotion or Logic in their thinking, processing, and speaking.  Here are a few hints: Emotion people talk about feelings, share people stories, and express compassion.  Logic people talk about tasks, engage in planning, and focus on results.
· Then determine if the person is Passive or Aggressive in the interactions and communication.  Passive people are cautious, take time to think, and are more indecisive.  Aggressive people are opinionated, jump right in, and are fast-paced making decisions quickly.

Step 2: Adjust to the style of the other person by matching then balancing emotion with emotion and logic with logic.  Match and balance the slower pace of the passive person or the faster pace of an aggressive person.

Step 3: Focus forward and ask for internal motivation.  Specifically, instead of talking about the past or the problem, talk about the future, solutions, options, and what it means personally to follow-through.

Step 4: Ask powerful questions to empower ownership.  Powerful questions, coaching questions, are open-ended, short, focused on the desired result, and confident in a positive outcome.  Powerful questions create an opportunity to explore possibilities and choose what is desired.  With exploration and choice comes ownership.  With ownership comes follow-through.

Coaching certification develops the skills for effectively applying these four steps to motivate follow-through!

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Unconscious Bias. Identify and Move Past

What is Unconscious Bias?  Vanderbilt says: “prejudice or unsupported judgments in favor of or against one thing, person, or group as compared to another, in a way that is usually considered unfair.”  The challenge of course is that if it is unconscious, how can it be identified?  Start with the premise that all humans have biases – conscious ones we are aware of and unconscious bias.  So, we know we do have biases. Unconscious Bias. Identify and Move Past

Now we can begin the work of identifying unconscious biases.  A few of the ways to do this include:

  • Deep personal reflection.
  • Being open to what others say.
  • Asking for feedback.
  • Researching unconscious biases.
  • Working with a coach to explore unconscious biases through reflection and questions.

Once unconscious biases are discovered, we can work on moving past them:

  • Reflect on reasons for the unconscious bias.
  • Consider the validity of the unconscious bias.
  • Decide whether to accept or change the unconscious bias.
  • Determine what to change.
  • Explore strategies.
  • Define actions.
  • Manage progress and accountability.

For many, working with a coach is the greatest tool for identifying and moving past unconscious biases.  It will be important to find a coach that has completed their coaching certification and has training in the areas of biases and diversity.

Each person that undertakes this work becomes their own best self while also bettering the world around them.

 

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Diversity and Connection in Coaching

What is diversity and connection?  Merriam-Webster says diversity is: “the condition of having or being composed of differing elements: variety especially; the inclusion / regard of different types of people (such as people of different races or cultures) in a group or organization.”  The Merriam Webster definition of connection includes: “the act of connecting;the state of being connected; a relation of personal intimacy; coherence; continuity.

The reason for using the word connection instead of inclusion is that inclusion in the Google dictionary is, “the action or state of including or of being included within a group or structure” which can imply that a group must allow an inclusion and thus retains control.  At the Center for Coaching Certification, we value everyone as an equal and support achieving equity. Diversity and Connection in Coaching

Coaching supports diversity and connection.  It starts with being open and accepting of all.  It is furthered through supporting others to also be open and accepting of all.  Examples of coaching questions that support diversity and connection include:

  • What is your thinking about people who are different?
  • What do you think they think?
  • What thinking is respectful?
  • How does your thinking impact workplace relationships?
  • How do your feelings impact workplace relationships?
  • What are ideal parameters for workplace relationships?
  • What are the reasons for having different people work together?
  • What are the benefits of having different people work together?
  • What are appropriate ground rules for different people working together?
  • How does having different people working together add value?
  • How can you maximize the variety of skills and perspectives?

Coaching Certification combined with coach training in Diversity and Connection provide the skills and the knowledge to support diversity and connection in the coaching profession and with the clients we all serve.

 

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Coaching Teams

Coaching is a fabulous tool for individuals and equally fabulous for supporting teams.  Awareness of the potential is increasing rapidly.  Following are some basic insights. Coaching Teams

What are the reasons for coaching a team?

  • Manage Conflict
  • Improve Relationships
  • Increase Productivity
  • Increase Engagement
  • Create or Enhance Culture

What are the steps for providing team coaching?

  • Define Purpose – for example, decide if the coaching is to focus on relationships, tasks, or processes.
  • Objectives – define specifically what you want to gain through coaching.
  • Approach – develop the approach for coaching and working with each other.
  • Processes – create processes to use during the coaching.
  • Engage in Coaching – create buy-in with everyone involved and engage fully in the process.

What are some tips, techniques, and tools for teach coaching?

  • Empower the team to choose focus and process.
  • Invite the team to share, reflect, brainstorm, and decide.
  • Adjust to personal and learning styles.
  • Keep it positive and proactive.
  • Consider using an assessment such as the DISC Team Assessment.
  • Co-create Tools for team awareness, tasks, and processes.

Once implemented, what does it take for the team coaching to run smoothly?

  • Assess the impact and effectiveness of the coaching.
  • Measure the results with metrics on engagement and productivity, outcomes with tasks and objectives, and qualitative feedback on relationships and individual impressions.
  • Adjust focus or processes to maximize the opportunities and enhance results.
  • Acknowledge the improvements, progress, and successes.

What are the opportunities for learning and developing team coaching skills and opportunities?

  • Advanced coach training and continuing education programs.
  • Surveying current client organizations.
  • Networking with prospective clients and considering team coaching as a possible solution.

Team coaching is a benefit for clients and an opportunity for coaching business.

 

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How do I decide if hiring a coach is the right move?

If you are thinking or wondering any of the following:

  • “Sometimes life gets so busy I don’t know if I’m coming or going.”
  • “All my ideas and thoughts jumble together.”
  • “I am unsure which direction I want to take.”
  • “I want to figure out my best strategy.”
  • “I want to build my confidence.”
  • “I want to manage my time and get organized.”
  • “I want to find the right job for me.”
  • “I want to earn a promotion.”
  • “I want to improve my skills.”
  • “I want to earn a promotion.”

Then coaching is likely a great opportunity. How do I decide if hiring a coach is the right move?

How will a coach help me get a plan, define a dream, or achieve a goal?  A coach will take you through the process of exploring opportunities and possibilities, considering challenges, identifying resources, creating strategies, defining action steps, and managing accountability.  A coach is a partner with the training and competencies to empower you being your best self.

The research shows the impact of coaching:

  • AMOCO Corporation, now part of British Petroleum, evaluated coaching over a ten-year period. The investigators reported that “compared to other AMOCO managers, coaching participants consistently demonstrated improved performance, increased ratings of potential for advancement and 50% higher average salary increases.  Moreover, the participants themselves attributed these results directly to the coaching they had received.”
  • Fortune Magazine cites an average return on investment of 600%.
  • MetrixGlobal LLC found coaching produced a 529% ROI and the financial benefits from employee retention boosted the overall ROI to 788%

How does coaching work to help me move forward?  Reflect on the difference between being told what to do and creating your own solutions.  A coach is trained through their coaching certification to empower you to discover your own answers and develop your own strategies.

 

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How do I determine if I will be a good coach?

When people ask this question, my reaction is often that if you care enough to ask the question you care enough to learn how to be a great coach.

What are the values and skills of a great coach?  Often they include:

  • Compassion
  • Empathy
  • A desire to make a difference
  • A willingness to be open
  • Vulnerability
  • Commitment to learning
  • Confidence in the ability of the client to achieve

Additionally, coach training is designed to develop the How do I determine if I will be a good coach? of a coach:

  1. Meeting Ethical Guidelines and Professional
  2. Establishing the Coaching Agreement
  3. Establishing Trust and Intimacy with the Client
  4. Coaching Presence
  5. Active Listening
  6. Powerful Questioning
  7. Direct Communication
  8. Creating Awareness
  9. Designing Actions
  10. Planning and Goal Setting
  11. Managing Progress and Accountability

How can I tell which coach training is my best bet?  The single most important consideration when choosing a coach training program is that it is approved by the International Coach Federation (ICF).  The second most important consideration is whether the school is a member of the Association of Coach Training Organizations (ACTO).  Then look at additional accreditations offered.  Check out the reviews and testimonials.  Talk to the team at the school and talk with the trainer.

To learn more about the Center for Coaching Certification, check out our program reviews on the SHRM site and video testimonials on YouTube.  Learn about our team members and trainers.

Connecting with the CCC team is also an opportunity to explore one-on-one your experience and skills and how they fit with becoming a coach.

 

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How do I listen?

Many perceive themselves good listeners.  At the same time, upon observing themselves and reflecting, many also realize their listening leaves something to be desired.  This is normal and it is also worth noticing and changing.

What gets in the way of listening?  Distractions, noise, hurrying, tiredness, thinking about other things, too many talking at once, or a lack of interest.  In addition, as humans, when someone is talking, we may be so focused on our response we miss hearing what they are saying.  Often, we are analyzing the speaker, the message, or how it is being said.  When someone says something that reminds us of our own experience, we get so caught up in remembering our experience we miss hearing what they said. How do I listen?

How can coach training help me listen better?  During coach training we talk about active listening, listening with the intention to understand.  Rephrasing, defined as succinctly summarizing what was said using key words of the other person, is both discussed and practiced.  Reflecting back what is behind the words deepens the practice of rephrasing.  As coaches continue to learn and practice, they use cumulative listening, listening over time and recalling what was said in the past that is applicable now.  Coaches learn to listen on many levels considering context, circumstances, personalities, motivations, etc.

In the same way coach training teaches and develops listening skills, working with a coach who has completed their coaching certification is an opportunity to experience being listened to as well as to observe and learn from listening being modeled.

The benefits of listening, while often forgotten, are also obvious.  It saves time, prevents misunderstandings, enhances communication, improves relationships, and makes life more enjoyable.

 

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Religious Beliefs versus Sexual Orientation: What do you think? Ethical Challenges Series

A coach and client have been working together for six months with a focus on the client’s business.  The client wants to discuss a challenge they are having with their same-sex partner.  The coach is religious and feels they cannot be effective because they feel same-sex relationships are wrong.  The coach has completed their coach training and is a member of the ICF and accountable to the Code of Ethics.

Possible Responses:

  • The coach can inform the client of their religious beliefs and let the client choose whether or not to continue.
  • The coach can inform the client that they have a personal conflict and remove themselves.
  • The coach can determine to give the client their best as a coach regardless of their own values.
  • The coach can work on their own beliefs to be open to all.
  • The coach can ask the client to support them in being open and accepting.
  • The coach can share the conflict and their desire to be open and ask the client how they want to handle it.
  • What else?

Refer to the ICF Code of Ethics:

4) Refrain from unlawful discrimination in occupational activities, including age, race, gender orientation, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, national origin or disability.

8) Strive at all times to recognize my personal issues that may impair, conflict with or interfere with my coaching performance or my professional coaching relationships. I will promptly seek the relevant professional assistance and determine the action to be taken, including whether it is appropriate to suspend or terminate my coaching relationship(s) whenever the facts and circumstances necessitate.

AND https://coachfederation.org/icf-ethics

Q: How can I better understand what determines discrimination when coaching clients?
A: Refer to state, provincial, or national law to determine what is considered discrimination in your area.

How do you recommend it be handled?

 

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Conflict of Interest: What do you think? Ethical Challenges Series

A coach has a client who owns their own hair salon.  The coach’s friend decides to start their own business – a hair salon – and will be a competitor of the client.  The coach has completed their coach training and is a member of the ICF and accountable to the Code of Ethics. Conflict of Interest  What do you think?

Possible Responses:

  • The coach simply continues coaching.
  • The coach ends the coaching engagement with no explanation.
  • The coach explains the conflict to the client and ends the coaching engagement.
  • The coach reflects on their own ability to continue coaching, decides they can continue, explains the possible conflict to the client, and gives the client the choice whether to continue.
  • The coach reflects on their own ability to continue coaching, decides they cannot continue, explains the conflict to the client, and removes themselves from the coaching relationship..
  • What else?

Refer to the ICF Code of Ethics:

8) Strive at all times to recognize my personal issues that may impair, conflict with or interfere with my coaching performance or my professional coaching relationships. I will promptly seek the relevant professional assistance and determine the action to be taken, including whether it is appropriate to suspend or terminate my coaching relationship(s) whenever the facts and circumstances necessitate.

13) Seek to be conscious of any conflict or potential conflict of interest, openly disclose any such conflict and offer to remove myself when a conflict arises.

22) Respect the client’s right to terminate the coaching relationship at any point during the process, subject to the provisions of the agreement. I shall remain alert to indications that there is a shift in the value received from the coaching relationship.

23) Encourage the client or sponsor to make a change if I believe the client or sponsor would be better served by another coach or by another resource and suggest my client seek the services of other professionals when deemed necessary or appropriate.

24) Maintain the strictest levels of confidentiality with all client and sponsor information unless release is required by law.

AND https://coachfederation.org/ethics-faqs

Q: I am coaching Jane, and a peer of hers, Alice, requests me to be her coach. Do I need to let Alice know I am already coaching Jane?
A: No, you do not need to. Unless you have Jane’s consent, you may not even mention it. Be aware, however, that this could present conflicts with confidentiality. Potential general conflicts should be clarified with each party.

Q: May I accept a coaching contract for a corporate mid-level manager when I am already coaching his boss?
A: You may accept this contract if you think that you can maintain an objective stance and confidentiality with both clients. You can discuss in general terms with the first client how he would feel about you coaching someone else in the company. Be aware it could present a conflict of interest while coaching, however, in hiring and firing decisions, etc.

Q: May I coach a family member or friend?
A: Yes, as long as you explain in advance how your role as a coach is different than your role as a friend or family member.

How do you recommend it be handled?

 

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